Monday, October 29, 2007

 

Sugar killer

Gurmar

This plant, found in the tropical forests of central and southern India, is called Gurmar (a Hindi word pronounced Gur(d)-maar) translating to sugar-killer. It's ancient Sanskrit name is meshas-ringi, or ram's horn, in the south it is known by the Tamil name Sirukurinjan, and it's Latin name is Gymnema sylvestre.

Gurmar has long been known is India as a useful herb. When chewed, Gurmar leaves stimulate insulin secretion and have blood sugar reducing properties. It blocks sweet taste receptors when applied to tongue, andremoves glycosuria in diabetics.

This sugar killer herb slows the absorption of sugars into the blood stream——and it also slows the conversion of sugar to fat.

The Gurmar herb has some other uses for the human body:

The leaves are also noted for lowering serum cholesterol and triglycerides——by blocking the absorption of dietary fats into the bloodstream. Gurmar corrects the metabolic activities of the liver, kidney and muscles. Chewing on the leaves of Gurmar dulls the sense of taste for sweet foods.


However individuals who use insulin or take oral medications to control diabetes should use it with caution. Blood sugar levels may fall too low. It is best taken after meals, where its qualities of sugar killing come in handy.

Powder derived from the roots of this sugar killer is useful in treating snakebites!



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